Herself's Houston Garden

Conservation through cultivation

Florescence Illusions 2015




April 28 to 29, 2015
Location
Audrey Jones Beck Building 5601 Main Street

Flower Show General Exhibition:
Tuesday and Wednesday
April 28-29, 2015
10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Museum members are free
General Museum Admission $15.00
Seniors $10.00
Students $7.50
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Florescence


Houston Orchid Show 2015




The Houston Orchid Society has our annual Spring Show and Sale 11-12th of April in the main lobby of the Houston Museum of Natural Science, 5555 Hermann Park Dr., Houston, TX 77030.

Admittance to the show and sale is free.

The show includes fabulous exhibits created by HOS members, other orchid societies and commercial sales vendors, featuring orchid plants as well as arrangements, corsages, orchid collectibles and educational information. The orchids in the exhibits and the exhibits themselves are officially judged before the show opens. First, second and third place ribbons and trophies are awarded to the best orchids, best-grown orchids and best exhibits.

Orchid shoppers are invited to visit the sales booths selling orchids to the public. There are local vendors and others from as far as California and Hawaii.

Houston Orchid Society Spring Show


Slime mold (Fuligo septica)




Slime mold

Slime mold

Yellow plasmodium, more commonly known as dog vomit slime mold is actually a fungus.

Grows on decaying wood and leaves, in the shade. Most of its life is spent as a single cell. When warm and humid the cells creep together to form a single unit. The cells lock into each other like keys in a lock. The unit then follows light sources and moves in search of bacteria, yeasts and other fungi to eat. By pulsing it can send the food throughout itself.

Slime molds leave a trail of slime behind which acts as memory. When they find the slime they move to explore a new area rather than re-search an area they’ve cleaned.

Reproduces by breaking back apart into multiple cells that are moved by the wind to begin new units when the weather conditions are right.

Slime molds have been placed in mazes with various food sources, they connect together and hunt out the food which is then fed to the entire unit through the tube network it creates in itself. If the food is placed on a map in large cities a highway system develops to transport the food that looks spooky similar to our own highways. Slime molds can find the most efficient routes through a maze.

Slime molds have been with us about 600 million years and were the inspiration for the movie ‘The Blob’.


Dodder vine (Cuscuta pentagona)




Dodder vine is an amazing plant, it is orange rather than green due to its lack of chlorophyl, it can’t make its own food.

Instead the dodder vine hatches in the spring from a seed and very slowly moves in a circle searching the air for beta-myrcene a volatile chemical emitted into the air by tomatoes and other plants. When it picks up the scent of beta-myrcene it grows in the direction of the odor until it finds the plant emitting it.

Once it reaches the plant it tightly winds itself around the plant, sinking roots into the host plant. The roots then suck up the juices in the host plant to feed itself. The host plant will then wilt and die.

Dodder vine also appears to exchange RNA with the host plant. Whether this is a way of exchanging information with the host plant or a way to reprogram it, much the way viruses reprogram our DNA is unknown.

Dodder is a member of the Morning Glory family.

It has very tiny leaves that are more like scales than leaves and tiny white flowers.

It is considered an invasive plant and a threat to the local ecology in Texas.

A new method of plant communication?
Genomic-scale exchange of mRNA between a parasitic plant and its host
YouTube video of dodder vine locating and reaching for a tomato plant
Cuscuta spp
Dodder management guide lines