Herself's Houston Garden

Conservation through cultivation

Mosquitoes




It’s that time again. The cool weather has kept them at bay but I’m starting to run in to them now. I heard a talk on mosquitoes this week and thought I’d share what I have learned.

There is only one local mosquito carrying West Nile in the Houston area so far this year. There are about 15 species of mosquitoes found in this area. We have a new mosquito joining us from Asia. She is larger than most, more hungry and leaves bigger and more bites on you should she find you. She is so big you’ll be able to see her tiger like stripes with the naked eye.

Mosquitoes rarely fly more than 100′ from where they are born, never more than 200′ So if your yard has tons of mosquitoes you’ve only yourself and neighbors to blame.

Female mosquitoes are the ones that feed on your blood, male mosquitoes ( those clouds of gnats ) eat pollen.

Eliminate all standing water – drainage ditches, leaky sprinklers, pet water bowls, toys that collect water. If you can not eliminate it, treat it.

Rinse, scrub and refill pet water dishes at least every other day, don’t forget the bird baths.

Fill in low areas around the yard.

Use insect repellent when you are out in the garden DEET is the recommended repellent. Wear long sleeves and long pants if possible while outdoors.

Watch for standing water in:
Rain gutters,
Trash,
Debris,
tarps and other plastic covers,
leaks of sprinklers and other water pipes,
containers,
plant saucers,
French drains,
etc.

Use mosquito dunks in drains and other places that have water that isn’t easily removed.

In New England the older women would pour a thin layer of oil on standing water. It is my understanding that prevents mosquitoes from breeding in the water.

See also:
Mosquito fish