Herself's Houston Garden

Conservation through cultivation

Houston Rain Barrel and Compost Bin Sale




Rain Barrel and Compost Bin Sale

On November 15, 2014, the Houston Green Building Resource Center will help area residents conserve natural resources residents to lessen the effects of the Texas heat by offering a 50-gallon rain barrel and 65-gallon compose bins at a discounted price. The rain barrels and compost bins, which typically retail at $119, will be offered for just $68.00 each and comes with instructions for easy set-up and use. Made from 100% recycled materials, rain barrels provide homeowners with an affordable alternative to watering from the tap.

These rain barrels are available at the $68 dollar price for a limited time and must be ordered online by Sunday November 16, 2014. Purchases can be picked at the Green Building Resource Center, 1002 Washington Ave on Saturday, November 22nd from 10am to 2pm. The Program Director, Steve Stelzer will also be available to answer questions and assist all who take part in this offer.

50 Gallon Rain Barrel. All components are included to start collecting and using your rainwater. The barrel is made of 100% recycled, HDPE material.

Barrels nest for easy storage – three barrels will easily fit in the back seat of a mid size sedan. It has a locking lid with a screened inlet, two overflow ports, and is able to be linked to other barrels. It also meets EPA safety standards and is made in the USA!

65 Gallon Compost Bin. Easy and convenient to convert your food and lawn waste into nutrient-rich compost. This bin holds up to 65 gallons and is constructed of rugged plastic resin. Ventilation holes throughout help with proper composting. This compost bin makes it easy to recycle your yard and kitchen waste, an important step in reducing the volume of garbage needlessly sent to landfills.

To order visit the website by November 16, 2014 RainBarrelProgram.org/Houston

Open since Earth Day, 2009, the GBRC is located in the corner of the LEED certified gold Houston Permitting Center.

See a demonstration vegetated roof that is irrigated with AC condensate. Browse the over 50 displays to familiarize yourself with green building technology and materials. For more information, please visit CodeGreenHouston.org


Houston Bromeliad Show Oct 25-26 2014




The Southwest Bromeliad Guild Show and Sale

“Bayou City Bromeliads”

Oct 25 (Sale 9-5) (Show 2-3)
Oct 26 (Sale 10-3) (Show 10-3)

Double Tree Hilton Intercontinental
15747 JFK Blvd, Houston, Texas

More information
713-858-3047
BromeliadSocietyHouston.com


Slime mold (Fuligo septica)




Slime mold

Slime mold

Yellow plasmodium, more commonly known as dog vomit slime mold is actually a fungus.

Grows on decaying wood and leaves, in the shade. Most of its life is spent as a single cell. When warm and humid the cells creep together to form a single unit. The cells lock into each other like keys in a lock. The unit then follows light sources and moves in search of bacteria, yeasts and other fungi to eat. By pulsing it can send the food throughout itself.

Slime molds leave a trail of slime behind which acts as memory. When they find the slime they move to explore a new area rather than re-search an area they’ve cleaned.

Reproduces by breaking back apart into multiple cells that are moved by the wind to begin new units when the weather conditions are right.

Slime molds have been placed in mazes with various food sources, they connect together and hunt out the food which is then fed to the entire unit through the tube network it creates in itself. If the food is placed on a map in large cities a highway system develops to transport the food that looks spooky similar to our own highways. Slime molds can find the most efficient routes through a maze.

Slime molds have been with us about 600 million years and were the inspiration for the movie ‘The Blob’.


Dodder vine (Cuscuta pentagona)




Dodder vine is an amazing plant, it is orange rather than green due to its lack of chlorophyl, it can’t make its own food.

Instead the dodder vine hatches in the spring from a seed and very slowly moves in a circle searching the air for beta-myrcene a volatile chemical emitted into the air by tomatoes and other plants. When it picks up the scent of beta-myrcene it grows in the direction of the odor until it finds the plant emitting it.

Once it reaches the plant it tightly winds itself around the plant, sinking roots into the host plant. The roots then suck up the juices in the host plant to feed itself. The host plant will then wilt and die.

Dodder vine also appears to exchange RNA with the host plant. Whether this is a way of exchanging information with the host plant or a way to reprogram it, much the way viruses reprogram our DNA is unknown.

Dodder is a member of the Morning Glory family.

It has very tiny leaves that are more like scales than leaves and tiny white flowers.

It is considered an invasive plant and a threat to the local ecology in Texas.

A new method of plant communication?
Genomic-scale exchange of mRNA between a parasitic plant and its host
YouTube video of dodder vine locating and reaching for a tomato plant
Cuscuta spp
Dodder management guide lines